15/05/2012

Monumenta 2012. Daniel Buren. "Excentrique(s), travail in situ".

Grand Palais, Nef. [PAR] France 10/05-21/06/2012
metalocus, LUIS TERRAIN.
Every year, Monumenta invites an internationally-renowned contemporary artist to produce a monumental work for display in the Grand Palais. Daniel Buren, one of France’s greatest artists, will be rising to this challenge during the fifth Monumenta event.

Following the installations by Anish Kapoor in 2011 and "PERSONNES"in 2010, now Monumenta 2012 invited famed French artist Daniel Buren for the fifth edition of the annual challenge to create an installation that will fill the soaring nave of Paris' Grand Palais. Buren's take on the site-specific concept is "Excentrique(s), travail in situ".

True to its name, what Buren has created can best be described as eccentric—a rainbow forest of hundreds of transparent, sunshade-like plastic saucers planted on flagstaffs spreads over the entire area of the 13,500-square-meter space, playing with the light pouring into the huge, glassy cupola to cover the ground with colorful reflected spots.

Open

Every days except Tuesdays, from 10am to 7pm Mondays and Wednesdays and 10am to midnight from Tuesday to Sunday.

Address

Grand Palais, Nef – Porte Nord. Avenue Winston Churchill. 75008 Paris. France.

Acces

Métro ligne 1, 9 et 13 Champs-Elysées Clemenceau or Franklin Roosevelt.

Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Drawing: Clo’e Floirat. Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Drawing: Clo’e Floirat. Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Drawing: Clo’e Floirat. Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
Drawing: Clo’e Floirat. Daniel Buren, « Excentrique(s), travail in situ », 2012, 380 000 m3. Monumenta 2012, Paris.
DANIEL
BUREN

Daniel Buren was born in Boulogne-Billancourt in 1938. In the early 1960s, he developed a radical art form which played simultaneously on an economy of means and the relationship between the support and the medium.

In 1965, when he was working on paintings combining circular forms and stripes of various sizes and colours, he decided to use industrial canvas with 8.7 cm wide vertical stripes (white alternating with a colour). This versatile support was the starting point for research into what painting is, how it is presented and, more broadly, the physical and social environment in which an artist works.

His works soon systematically questioned the place in which and for which they were designed. At first that meant streets, in 1965, and then galleries, museums, landscapes or architectural structures. For these installations he coined the expression “work in situ.” The term has characterised a large part of his production ever since.

The stripes, which he calls “a visual tool”, are used to focus attention on the significant features of the place in which he works. He deploys them within specific and sometimes complex arrangements combining painting, sculpture and architecture.

His works in situ play on viewpoints, spaces, colours, light, motion, the environment, outlines and projection; they may be unashamedly decorative or radically transform the venue.

Incisive, critical and committed, Daniel Buren’s work is in continual flux and always provokes comment, admiration and argument. In 1986, he produced his first and most controversial public commission, The Two Plateaux, for the main courtyard of the Palais-Royal in Paris. That same year he represented France at the Venice Biennale and carried off the Golden Lion.

He is one of the most active and best-known artists on the international scene and his work has been presented in the world's greatest institutions and in a wide variety of sites.

In 2007, Daniel Buren was awarded the Præmium imperiale by the Emperor of Japan, a distinction regarded as the Nobel Prize for the visual arts.

15/05/2012

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