02/11/2011

RADICAL HOUSE. House NA. Sou Fujimoto Architects. 藤本壮介建築設計事務所

in JA 83.[TOKIO] Japan. [VIDEO]
metalocus, PEDRO NAVARRO
With the release of the latest issue of Japanese magazine JA 83, it is published an exclusive tour inside the newly completed NA House, designed by Sou Fujimoto Architects. Thin steel pillars placed supported delicately a "pile of boxes" transparent deployed in height.

The house for a young couple in Tokyo built like a stack of boxes on multiple levels. "In one way the house is like a single space, but each room is also a tiny space of its own. The clients said they wanted to live like nomads within the house - they didn't have specific plans for each room. The house looks radical but for the clients it seemed quite natural." with these words Sou Fujimoto expressed in a recent interview with FW Monocle. More at Japan Architect.

Is ecology an issue in house design ? I’m very interested in this subject but it’s about something more fundamental than using solar panels and recyclable materials. I like to try to build in a way that is sensitive to the environment – using the flow of air and the positioning of trees, for example. But all my houses are air-conditioned. The Japonese summer is very hot. With House N, the outer shell cuts 70 per cent of the direct sunlight so that has an effect. Ideally, you want to combine practical ecology with an interesting architectural experience. Interview with FW Monocle

Model. House NA, Suginami-ku, Tokyo, Japan , 2007-2011.
Exterior view. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto. Photography © Iwan Baan.
Detail exterior view. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto. Photography © Iwan Baan.
Interior view. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto. Photography © Iwan Baan.
Interior view. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto. Photography © Iwan Baan.
Exterior view. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto. Photography © Iwan Baan.
Exterior view. Video screenshot. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Interior view. Video screenshot. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Exterior view. Video screenshot. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Interior view. Video screenshot. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Site plan. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Levels plan. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Sections. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Elevations. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Sections. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Sections. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Diagram. House NA. By Sou Fujimoto.
Cover. JA 83. JA83 is a special issue devoted to structural design. Besides the rich variety of ideas conceived by architects, innovative systems produced by structural designers are beginning to give new character to space. Emerging spatial frameworks worthy of attention have been applied at various scales and functions, ranging from houses that resemble furniture to buildings with vast public components.
Inner pages. JA 83. The title of this issue “Emergent Spatial Frames” addresses the cross-fertilization of contemporary spatial ideas and structural principles. Focusing on the creative collaborations among architects and structural designers, this issue presents some 13 projects with unique qualities and processes that represent the fruits of a renewed relationship between theories of space and the logic of mechanics.
Inner pages. JA 83.
Inner pages. JA 83.
SOU
FUJIMOTO

Sou Fujimoto was born in Hokkaido, Japan on August 4, 1971. In 1994 he graduated in architecture at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. He established his own architecture studio, the agency Sou Fujimoto Architects, in Tokyo in 2000, and since 2007 a ​​professor at Kyoto University.

He was first noticed in 2005 when he won the prestigious AR – international Architectural Review Awards in the Young architect’s category, a prize that he garnered for three consecutive years, and the Top Prize in 2006.

In 2008, he was invited to jury these very AR Awards. The same year he won the JIA (Japan Institute of Architects) prize and the highest recognition from the World Architecture Festival, in the Private House section. In 2009, the magazine Wallpaper* accorded him their Design Award.
 Sou Fujimoto published “Primitive Future” in 2008, the year’s best-selling architectural text. His architectural design, consistently searching for new forms and spaces between nature and artifice.

Photographer: David Vintiner

03/11/2013

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