Cronocaos, OMA’s exhibition on preservation, opens in New York.

Cronocaos, OMA’s exhibition on preservation, opens in New York.
Opening in New Museum. [NYC] 5/7/2011 - 6/5/2011
metalocus, JOSÉ JUAN BARBA
Three weeks ago we told you about Initiative hitting New York this weekend for the New Museum’s Festival of Ideas. The Festival officially kicks off tonight with a keynote speech by OMA founder Rem Koolhaas.

Cronocaos, OMA's exhibition on the increasingly urgent topic of preservation in architecture and urbanism, opens to the press today in New York. First shown at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale and now occupying the New Museum's new gallery space – a former restaurant supply store on the Bowery – Cronocaos examines the growing "empire" of preservation and its consequences for the way we build, demolish, and remember.

Around 12 percent of the planet now falls under various regimes of natural and cultural preservation. "Through our respect for the past, heritage is becoming more and more the dominant metaphor for our lives today – a situation we call Cronocaos," OMA founding partner Rem Koolhaas says. "We are trying to find what the future of our memory will look like."

Cronocaos – featuring new material in its New York edition – includes historic objects and unseen OMA archival material; analysis of the rapid growth of preserved urban and natural territories; and a timeline of OMA projects that have confronted the issue of preservation over 35 years of practice, including the 2001 proposed extension to the Whitney Museum in New York and the curatorial masterplan for the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Each project within the OMA timeline will take the form of a “postcard” for visitors to more


Rem Koolhaas was born in Rotterdam in 1944. He began his career as a journalist, working for the Haagse Post, and as a set-designer in the Netherlands and Hollywood. He beganHe frequented the Architectural Association School in London and studied with Oswald Mathias Ungers at Cornell University. In 1978, he wrote Delirious New York: a retroactive manifesto for Manhattan, which has become more