Lunch Atop A Skyscraper: The Story Behind The 1932 Photo

16/12/2016
Lunch Atop A Skyscraper: The Story Behind The 1932 Photo
Time
metalocus, JOSÉ JUAN BARBA
Lunch Atop a Skyscraper. Author: Unknown, 1932
Time ha realizado una selección de las 100 imágenes más influyentes de todos los tiempos "The Most Influential Images of All Time", la mayoría son muy conocidas y sin embargo siguen sorprendiendo, por su fuerza, calidad, encuadre, oportunidad o documento. Entre ellas me ha vuelto a llamar la atención la imagen de los trabajadores descansando en una viga durante la construcción del RCA Building (ahora el Edificio GE), en Nueva York. ​of the flagship RCA Building (now the GE Building), was staged as part of a promotional campaign for the massive skyscraper complex.
The picture, of these 11 men casually eating, chatting and sneaking a smoke as if they weren’t 256m / 840 feet above Manhattan, was taken on the 69th floor as part of a promotional campaign for the massive skyscraper complex, during the depression time (we are talking about 1931-32).

Lewis Hine’s celebrated portrait of 11 Depression-era ironworkers, lunching along an I-beam on the unfinished Empire State Building.
 
No?

Christine Roussel is the voice used to tell the story of the image in the Time video, where she affirms and denies the well-known attribution to Lewis Hine"the photographer and the identities of most of the subjects remain a mystery—the photographers Charles C. Ebbets, Thomas Kelley and William Leftwich were all present that day, and it’s not known which one took it" 
 
No, on several counts.

The shot isn’t by Hine. And it’s not atop the Empire State Building — despite common misperceptions, misrepresentations and an Internet that insists otherwise. Taken Sept. 20, 1932, during the construction of Rockefeller Center, the well-known portrait of 11 immigrant ...read more