After announcing the launch of its Reserve Roastery in Tokyo back in 2016, Starbucks has now given a look inside the Kengo Kuma-designed space. The store is Starbucks’ fifth Reserve Roastery, and the third time that the concept has opened outside of North America, following the Milan location launched last year and the Shanghai space that opened in 2017.
 
Situated in the Nakameguro district of Tokyo, the Reserve Roastery’s design is inspired by the cherry blossom trees that line the Meguro river. The glass walls and terraced floors of the roastery are designed to blend into the surrounding neighborhood, as well as offering views of the cherry blossoms and river. Another influence on the design was the work of local craftspeople, who’s work is highlighted throughout the space. The roastery also features the AMU Inspiration Lounge, designed by Starbucks to host community gatherings and workshops.

 
The roastery designed by Kengo Kuma is set to offer over 100 coffee and tea options, as well as serving Italian food and stocking exclusive merchandise. The space also boasts Starbucks Japan’s first cocktail lounge, located on the third floor of the Reserve Roastery. The Tokyo Starbucks Reserve Roastery is open now.
 
The four-story coffee temple in Tokyo's Nakameguro neighborhood opened to the caffeine-deprived morning crowds at 7 a.m. today.

"The Tokyo Roastery is the only Starbucks Roastery location designed in collaboration with a local architect from the ground up," explains the project description.

The exterior was brought to life in collaboration with renowned Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Envisioned by Liz Muller, Starbucks chief design officer and lead designer for all five Roasteries globally, the Roastery highlights the work of local craftsmen and women to create an enchanting destination for coffee exploration and discovery.

Upon entering the Roastery, customers are greeted by the world’s largest Starbucks Roastery coffee cask, four stories and more than 55 feet of blush-tinted copper adorned with hand-crafted copper cherry blossoms, which changes hues throughout the day in different lights. The expansive cask was built using the technique of tsuchime, a tradition of copper beating, where each person involved in the building of the Roastery was offered the chance to hammer a portion to create its texture and pattern."
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Kengo Kuma was born in Yokohama (Kanagawa, Japan) in 1954. He studied architecture at the University of Tokyo, finishing his degree in 1979. In 1987, he opened the "Spatial Design Studio". In 1990 he founded "Kengo Kuma & Associates" and extend the study to Europe (Paris, France) in 2008. Since 1985 and until 2009, has taught as visiting professor and holder at the universities of Columbia, Keio, Illinois and Tokyo.

Main Awards:

· 2011 The Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology's Art Encouragement Prize for "Yusuhara Wooden Bridge Museum."
· 2010 Mainichi Art Award for “Nezu Museum.”
· 2009 "Decoration Officier de L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres" (France).
· 2008 Energy Performance + Architecture Award (France). Bois Magazine International Wood Architecture Award (France).
· 2002 Spirit of Nature Wood Architecture Award (Finland).
· 2001 Togo Murano Award for “Nakagawa-machi Bato Hiroshige Museum.”
· 1997 Architectural Institute of Japan Award for “Noh Stage in the Forest”. First Place, AIA DuPONT Benedictus Award for “Water/Glass” (USA).

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